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Archive for August 6th, 2009

I decided to try to do Nablopomo for August.   I’m pretty sure that it is going to be a real test.  The theme for the month is “Tomorrow,” and I just don’t see how I can write about tomorrow for a whole month.   It smacks of pushing procrastination.   And right now all I can think is “I only know about today.   Tomorrow never comes, you know.”   Or something equally profound:   All my yesterdays were once my tomorrows.   Wait, maybe I shouldn’t burn that thought today, but save it for tomorrow’s post.

Too late.

I have had a “Eureka!” moment regarding some things that have been going on in my labyrinth.  As I have mentioned several times previously, I do have a labyrinth on my property which is listed in the World Labyrinth Locator.   Not only did we think it would be cool to have strangers from around the world stop by and visit and walk our labyrinth when we built it, we were hoping they would come.

As I have also mentioned previously, the inner circle of our labyrinth has been gifted with many rocks from all over the world, including at least one rock from every United State, and so far dozens of countries that encompass all seven (yes, SEVEN!) continents in the world.

I have actually photographed the entire circle more than once, and over the years I have been puzzled by the fact that on occasion a rock may disappear from the inner circle.   So far, the amber from Germany has disappeared twice.   I collected several pieces of amber on a trip to the tailings pile of a local gravel pit, so I replaced it the first time it left.   There are several insignificant white rocks from Romania that have disappeared, and now a malachite piece from Zaire is gone.

It is now coming clear to me what may have happened to the rocks.   I originally thought maybe a blue jay or mockingbird liked a shiny rock and picked it up.    Pack rats are known to collect things that attract them, but usually they “trade up”, leaving whatever they had already happened upon in place of the new “love object.”

But I recently read a blog entry where a person described her magical walk through a labyrinth in her community.   It is a beautiful description by a beautiful person, but the last part of the walk made me go “Oooh, that seems wrong to me.”   She describes how on her walk out she is attracted by a small rock in the labyrinth that looks like an animal totem that had meaning for her, and she took it with her as a reminder to her of the lessons she learned during the walk.

Suddenly I wondered if one or all of the labyrinth walkers I had hosted over the years had seen a rock that spoke to them in my labyrinth and took it with them.   None of my missing rocks are large; I doubt e one the size of two basketballs that is from Minnesota is in any danger of being lugged off.  Some of the nation representatives in my labyrinth are vanishingly small.   I have a pea sized lump of clay from Vietnam under the “Pan” rock.   That came to me in a very serendipitous way.

Many years ago an organization I belonged to happen to have their monthly meeting in my living room.  Our speaker was a Vietnam War veteran who was talking to us about his organization:  Missing In Action and Prisoners of War Association.   He had a display of objects germane to his talk, and  to provide him a good looking backdrop for his things, I placed a white sheet over my card table.   On it he put a lot of items he had saved from his time in Vietnam, one of which was his combat boots.  During his talk, he told us he had never cleaned them when he got home after being mustered out, and so they still had the soil of the war torn jungle on them.   After his talk, he packed up all his gear and left us to our business meeting.   When I started to collect the sheet at the end of the evening, I noticed that one of his boots had shed a small piece of dried mud.   I collected it carefully, and carried it out to the center of the labyrinth to join the other World Rocks there.

Even an insignificant rock may have meaning to the labyrinth and the person who built it.  The questions I had after I read the blog post were these:   Did that small white rock represent a gift from a friend who was travelling?   Did she have the right to remove it without at least leaving a gift in return?  Did it even occur to her that that rock may have become an integral part of the energy pattern of the labyrinth?  There are others I could think of, but those are enough for now.

And who has the piece of malachite from Zaire?   the amber from the Germany?  the tiny white stones from Bulgaria?

Perhaps they need the energy of those rocks more than the labyrinth.   Do they know?   Did they think?  Do they care?

I don’t know.

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